Carbon Monoxide is a gas that, when concentrated in your home, can cause serious medical issues. The gas is generated by many of the gas-powered appliances in your home but proper venting ensures that the gas is moved out of the home. The CDC reports that nearly 20,000 Americans visit the emergency room each year with signs of CO poisoning. Having a working carbon monoxide detector in your home will help detect this colorless, odorless gas before it is too late. Here are a few ways that carbon monoxide can creep its way into your home.

Gas Heating Systems

Your furnace consumes gas to heat your home, and when the burn process takes place, carbon monoxide is produced. Part of a routine furnace inspection is to make sure the furnace is venting properly. If the venting becomes blocked or clogged, the gases cannot escape.

Stoves and Ovens

If the stove in your kitchen is fueled by natural gas, there is a risk that your stove is not efficiently handling the byproduct of burning the gas.

Gas Powered Water Heaters

Just like a furnace, a water heater that uses gas must be properly vented. Since most water heaters are located in the center of the home, the vent pipe must reach outside of the home. Always check for debris, nests and even animals to keep your vent pipes clear.

Outdoor Grills

Outdoor grills give off a tremendous amount of heat which is why you should use them away from your house. Gas or Charcoal grills both produce carbon monoxide and should be kept away from open doors or windows.

Motor Vehicles

For homes that have garages under the dwelling, carbon monoxide produced by your car can seep up through the floors. Never leave a running vehicle in the garage that is attached to or under your home.

Fireplaces

A fireplace is another potential source of carbon monoxide. Whether it is wood-burning or gas log fireplace, the emissions that are given off can accumulate.

A CO detector can help detect leaks from any of these scenarios. You can find a carbon monoxide detector at your local home improvement store near the smoke alarms. Just like smoke alarms, CO detectors should be tested regularly. If the carbon monoxide detector is battery powered, set a reminder for yourself to change the batteries every six months.

If your carbon monoxide detector goes off regularly, you may have a leak. Since the furnace is potentially the biggest producer of carbon monoxide in your home, call Atlas Butler to inspect your system and ensure that everything is venting correctly.